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2011-12 Departmental Performance Report

2011-12
Departmental Performance Reports

Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada


The original was signed by


The Honourable Tony Clement
President of the Treasury Board of Canada and Minister responsible for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario


Table of Contents

Commissioner's Message

Section I: Organizational Overview


Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome


Section III: Supplementary Information


Section IV: Other Items of Interest


Endnotes


Commissioner's Message

Image of Mario Dion

The true test of an organization with a mandate defined in an act is, in my opinion, not only the respect of its provisions but also the knowledge that citizens have about the implementation of the act and the confidence it gives them.

My Office aims to build a solid reputation and works at this every day. It is through concrete actions that this image is built and therefore, for the past year, we have focused on concrete achievements.

First, we took aggressive measures to dispel the reservations that hung over decisions rendered to 2010.

Second, I am confident that through the reports to Parliament and timely applications to the Tribunal, public servants and Canadians will become aware of our ability to contribute to strengthening public sector integrity. This public consciousness began soon after the tabling of our first case report on March 8, 2012, and the filing of three applications to the Tribunal.

My Office now has sufficient qualified employees to carry out its mandate, which likely explains the unprecedented number of cases that were completed in 2011-2012. Moreover, based on the results of the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey, employees are satisfied with their work environment. In fact, our results were considerably more positive than the public service average for almost all the questions.

This year, we saw an increase of nearly 15% in the number of cases submitted and it is reasonable to believe that this trend will continue, considering the current context within the public service. The long-awaited creation of a new Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector, a serious breach of which constitutes wrongdoing pursuant to the Act, could also have an impact on the volume of cases we will be managing in the coming years.

We are ready to face the challenge, as shown by the strategic plan we developed together. I would like to thank all the members of my team for their excellent work. It is with confidence that I begin the next six years as Public Sector Integrity Commissioner.

Mario Dion
Public Sector Integrity Commissioner



Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada (the Office) was set up to administer the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA or the Act), which came into force in April 2007. The Office is mandated to establish a safe, independent, and confidential process for public servants and members of the public to disclose potential wrongdoing in the federal public sector. The Office also exists to protect from reprisal those public servants who have filed disclosures or participated in related investigations. In addition to its legislated mandate, the Office emphasizes prevention of wrongdoing and the promotion of open dialogue in the federal public sector.

Responsibilities

The Office has jurisdiction over the entire public sector, including separate agencies and parent Crown corporations, which represents approximately 400,000 public servants. Under the PSDPA, members of the general public can also come to the Office with information about a possible wrongdoing in the federal public sector. However, the Office does not have jurisdiction over the Canadian Forces, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, and the Communications Security Establishment, each of which is required under the PSDPA to establish internal procedures for disclosure of wrongdoing and protection against reprisal similar to those set out in the Act.

The Office conducts independent reviews and investigations of disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal in a fair and timely manner. In cases of founded wrongdoing, the Commissioner issues findings, through the tabling of a case report to Parliament, and makes recommendations to chief executives for corrective action. The Commissioner exercises exclusive jurisdiction over the review, investigation and conciliation of reprisal complaints. This includes making applications to the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal, which has the power to determine if reprisals have taken place and to order appropriate remedial and disciplinary action.

The Office is guided at all times by the public interest and the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness. The Commissioner submits an annual report to Parliament and special reports may also be submitted to Parliament at any time.

More information about the Office's mandate, roles, responsibilities, activities, statutory reports and the PSDPA can be found on the Office's website[i].

Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

The Office has one strategic outcome that guides the pursuit of its mandate and reflects the long-term benefits sought for Canadians as demonstrated in the following chart:

Image of Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture

[Text version]

Organizational Priorities

Summary of Progress Against Priorities
PriorityType1Strategic Outcome and/or Program Activity
Third party review of all past closed case files New Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • An independent review of the 221 files that had been completed since the inception of the Office was initiated in late 2010-11 and completed in 2011-12. The results of this review were that: one file be referred to the Tribunal; six files be reopened for investigation; and that a further seventeen files be reopened at the admissibility stage.
  • The file review process demonstrated that there were more procedural deficiencies in the early years of operations of the Office: almost half occurred in 2007-08, the first year. The deficiency rate decreased notably with time. The review concluded with a lessons learned report and improvements to operations being implemented.
Provide an efficient, safe and confidential disclosure mechanism, and protect against reprisals disclosers and persons who participate in investigations Ongoing Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • The Office tabled in Parliament the first report of a founded case of wrongdoing and three complaints of reprisal were filed with the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal. These activities included the development of supporting processes and procedures.
  • Arising from the independent file review, operational recommendations, such as improving file documentation processes and ensuring consistent use of the file management system, were implemented.
  • A new case management system was not introduced as planned in last year's RPP. Alternatively, upgrades to the current system were implemented to meet PSIC`s current needs. The Office is participating in a multi department coordinated effort to define requirements, evaluate and select a common and affordable system that may be implemented at a later time. This revised direction is in line with the government wide initiative to standardize systems.
  • The Office participated at the public interest disclosure conference, engaging with other Canadian jurisdictions on the implementation of public sector disclosure regimes and best practices.
Revise and enhance the performance measurement framework Ongoing Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • In August 2011, as part of the Treasury Board Secretariat's Management, Resources and Results Structure, the Performance Measurement Framework was amended. Development and implementation will be continuing into 2012-13.
  • Operational statistics for monthly internal reporting and monitoring were enhanced and will continue to be refined, including the development of performance standards.
  • The 2011-12 Annual Report detailed operational statistics including the number of disclosures and complaints of reprisal received, the number of files closed, and the stages of active files.
Strengthen external outreach activities throughout the federal public sector using multiple communication channels Ongoing Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • In 2011, an Advisory Committee, representing key stakeholders, was established to provide a structured framework for consultation. The Committee met four times during 2011-12.
  • The Office hosted a government-wide workshop for Senior Officers responsible for internal disclosure within their departments or other federal institutions.
  • The first focus group study by the office was initiated and the final report: Perceptions Related to the Disclosure of Wrongdoing in the Federal Public Sector was delivered in December 2011. The findings will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of communications messages and inform strategies and activities which will strengthen the disclosure and reprisal program.
  • The Office increased the use of its Web site as a communication channel and revitalized its catchphrase and promotional items.
  • The Office continued to:
    • Attend targeted functional government conferences as an exhibitor.
    • Brief new senior public service leaders on the PSDPA.
    • Accept speaking engagements and host delegations, as appropriate.
Ensure appropriate operational capacity to facilitate workflow and sound decision-making Ongoing Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • The focus, to ensure operational capacity, was staffing efforts in the operational group, where a number of positions were filled. In total the Office successfully completed 16 staffing actions, covering both casual and indeterminate positions.
  • The plans to develop a standing offer list to access external experts on a timely basis to support the disclosure and reprisal management function was put on hold.
Provide employees with the right support to strengthen the organization Ongoing Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program
  • Upgrades to the case management system and desk top computers enhanced key tools used by the operations group.
  • An expansion of the Office accommodations was completed to meet the needs of the growing level of resources.
  • The planned development of an intranet site to facilitate the dissemination and communication of information and policies was not initiated. Rather, emphasis was placed on two-way communication at the monthly all staff meetings, where staff is given the opportunity to contribute to the agenda and welcomed to participate.
  • The timing for finalizing PSIC`s code of conduct was adjusted so that it could be aligned to the Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector which came into force on April 2, 2012.

1. Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

Risk Analysis

The ability to achieve an effective disclosure and reprisal management program depends on the timeliness and effectiveness, with which management identifies, evaluates, prioritizes, and develops initiatives to address areas where risks which could impede success are the greatest. The Office operated in an environment of heightened media attention generated by the report of the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) issued in December 2010. The heightened media attention continued as the new Commissioner was appointed and the Office tabled the first report of a founded case of wrongdoing. The Office was not fully staffed as it entered 2011-12, its fifth year of existence, and had experienced an unusually high turnover in its early years of operations.

Trust in and Awareness of the Office

The risk of losing the trust of public servants and the general public in the Office's capacity to carry out its mandate heightened following the OAG's December 2010 report concerning the former Commissioner. Individuals are less likely to make disclosures if they do not have a clear understanding of the services available or if they lack trust that they will be adequately protected and that their concerns will be appropriately addressed. To help mitigate this risk, the Office conducted a comprehensive third-party review of all closed case files since the inception of the Office to address any doubts about past decisions. Following the release of the OAG report, the Office experienced an approximate 15% increase in the number of disclosures and reprisals reported.

In order to gain a better understanding of the views, motivations and concerns surrounding the disclosure of wrongdoing by federal public servants, and to evaluate the effectiveness of communications messages, a focus group study was conducted. The study provided valuable insight, concerns and feedback surrounding the disclosure regime and the full report is available in the electronic collection on Library and Archives Canada Web site [ii].

Internal capacity

Maintaining human resource levels, namely through the attraction, development and retention of employees with adequate competencies, skills and experiences is a demanding management responsibility. The high mobility of skilled professionals and the greater impact of turnover on small organizations can create challenges for knowledge transfer, continuity and timeliness in delivering the program. The Office executed a human resource management plan which resulted in a significant increase in hiring. This included the staffing of many key positions in the Office and growth in the Operations group.

Information Security

Information security is critical in the context of disclosures, investigations and the need for preserving confidentiality. Sensitive or private information must be protected from potential loss or inappropriate access in order to avoid potential litigation, damaged reputation and reluctance in coming forward. The Office has implemented many practices aimed at ensuring the security of information, which include briefing and confidentiality agreements, random information security checks within premises, controlled access for the storage of sensitive information, training for personnel on managing records and information, and a formal assessment of the effectiveness of the management of security which will be completed in 2012.

Summary of Performance

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ thousands)

Planned SpendingTotal AuthoritiesActual Spending
6,868 7,378 5,666

PSIC`s total authorities of $7.4 million reflect an increase of $0.5 million (7%) over the planned spending of $6.9 million. The incremental authorities were for the 5% operating budget carry forward from 2010-11 and reimbursement for severance payments and parental leave. PSIC`s total 2011-12 spending of $5.7 million is $1.7 million (23%) lower than its total authorities of $7.4 million. The lower level of spending was a result of the decision to not implement a new case management system so as not to divert operational staff`s attention from the review of files, as well as the timing of filling vacancies and number of vacancies filled as compared to planned levels of staffing activity.

2011-12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])

PlannedActualDifference
39 30 9


 

Summary of Performance Tables

Progress Toward Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Wrongdoing in the federal public sector is detected, resolved and reported, while public servants are protected from reprisal, resulting in a greater integrity in the workplace.
Performance IndicatorsTargets2011-12 Performance
Incidence of wrongdoing reported and complaints of reprisal received There is no set target, however the level of incidence is tracked and reported in the Annual Report. In 2011-12 the Office received:
General Inquiries                 300
Disclosures of Wrongdoing   79
Complaints of Reprisal          36
These new cases received exclude the cases reintroduced as a result of the independent file review. The incidents in each category increased from the prior year by 17%, 10%, and 44% respectively.
Stakeholder perception of PSIC and the Act Targets have not been established; however in 2012-13 plans include development towards a target. Feedback in 2011-12 was obtained from:
  • 10 public service focus groups, representing management and non management and a cross section of regions.
  • 56 survey respondents who had participated at the Seniors Officers Workshop.

Performance Summary, Excluding Internal Services
Program Activity2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ thousands)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes[iii]
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Disclosure and Reprisal Program Management 3,318 4,632 4,632 4,742 3,499 A transparent, accountable and responsive federal government

PSIC's actual spending in 2011-12 towards its Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program was $3.5M, which is $1.1M (24%) lower than planned spending and $1.2M (26%) lower than total authorities. The reduced level of spending is mainly due to the decision to not implement a new case management system at this time and personnel costs not incurred resulting from vacancies during the year. Year-over-year expenditures increased by $0.2 million (5%) as personnel were hired and associated equipment costs were incurred, which were in part offset by the nonrecurring costs from 2010-11 of one-time payments made to the former commissioner and the professional fees for the 3rd party review of past closed files.

Performance Summary for Internal Services
Program Activity2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12 ($ thousands)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Spending
Total
Authorities
Actual
Spending
Internal Services 2,006 2,236 2,236 2,636 2,167

PSIC's actual spending in 2011-12 towards its Internal Services was $2.2M, which is $0.1M (3%) lower than planned spending and $0.5M (18%) lower than total authorities. The reduced level of spending in comparison to the total authorities is a result of the unused operating budget carry forward. Year-over-year expenditures increased $0.2 million (8%), largely as a result of increased costs for staffing services in support of the recruitment initiative to execute the human resources plan.

Expenditure Profile

This graphic depicts the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada's expenditure profile.

[Text version]

PSIC`s spending has increased from $3.5 million in its first year of operations to $5.7 million in 2011-12, which is largely a reflection of the increase in FTE. Personnel costs of the Office typically account for approximately 66% of its spending and professional fees account for approximately 22% of its spending, as many of the internal services are contracted services provided by other government departments.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada's organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2012 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada's website [iv].


Section II: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

Wrongdoing in the federal public sector is detected, resolved and reported, while public servants are protected from reprisal, resulting in a greater integrity in the workplace.

Program Activity 1: Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program

Program Activity Descriptions

To provide advice to federal public sector employees and members of the public who are considering making a disclosure and to accept, investigate and report on disclosures of information concerning possible wrongdoing. Based on this activity, the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner will exercise exclusive jurisdiction over the review, conciliation and settlement of complaints of reprisal, including making applications to the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal to determine if reprisals have taken place and to order appropriate remedial and disciplinary action.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned SpendingTotal AuthoritiesActual Spending
4,632 4,742 3,499

PSIC's actual spending in 2011-2012 towards its Disclosure and Reprisal Management Program was $3.5M, which is $1.1M (24%) lower than planned spending and $1.2M (26%) lower than total authorities. The reduced level of spending is mainly due to the decision to not implement a new case management system and lower personnel costs resulting from vacancies during the year.

2011-12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
PlannedActualDifference
29 21 8

Program Activity Performance Summary
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
TargetsActual
Results
Increased confidence in Canadian federal public institutions Inquiries and investigations are conducted efficiently and in accordance with the PSDPA
  • Review of current practices and establishment or refinement of all processes and procedures
Improvements to file documentation processes, and ensuring consistent use of the file management system have been implemented.
Public servants and Canadians are aware of the role and mandate of the Office
  • Reach out to all federal public servants
  • Reach out to the general public
PSIC was an exhibitor at 5 key conferences attended by public servants and provided 8 one-on-one briefing sessions with new public service leaders. There were 33 Canadian newspaper and on line articles following the tabling of the first founded case of wrongdoing.
Recognition of disclosure as a pro-social behaviour
  • Develop tools and best practices
  • Implement the Outreach/ Prevention Strategy
The Office`s catchphrase was updated to "Tell us. You are protected.", aiming to reassure potential disclosers that the Act and our Office protects them by protecting their confidentiality.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The Office achieved a number of significant milestones in the ongoing implementation of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (the Act) in 2011-12. These achievements underscored the breadth and range of our mandate, and they speak to the importance and sensitivity of the responsibilities given to the Office by Parliament to deal with both disclosures of wrongdoing and complaints of reprisal. Specifically:

  • In March the Office tabled in Parliament the first report of a founded case of wrongdoing. This case report, involving multiple allegations, found that wrongdoing had occurred based on several components of wrongdoing as defined in the Act.
  • The first three complaints of reprisal were filed with the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Tribunal. This Tribunal is composed of three judges of the Federal Court. Under the Act, the Commissioner applies to the Tribunal after the Office investigates a complaint and determines that there were reasonable grounds to believe that a reprisal has occurred.
  • This past year, conciliation was recommended in two reprisal cases where it was seen as an appropriate option for settlement. In one, it was rejected by one of the parties, and the investigation continued. In the other case, conciliation was agreed to and was ongoing as of March 31, 2012.
  • In twelve months the Office closed 110 cases, including the completion of 6 investigations and the 1 case tabled in Parliament. As at the end of the year there were 120 active cases, of which 39 case files were investigations underway, 78 case files were under admissibility review, and 3 cases were before the Tribunal.

Section I provides a summary of activities aligned to the organizational priorities completed by PSIC in 2011-12, and highlights any changes made throughout this period.

Lessons Learned

On the conclusion of the independent file review of closed files, a 'lessons learned' session was conducted with all staff. Operational recommendations, such as improving file documentation, processes, and ensuring consistent use of the file management system have been implemented. In addition, significant upgrades to the Case Management System software were made. This review also highlighted the challenges of interpreting and applying the Act, particularly in the early days of the Office. The Office has commenced the process of developing operational decision-making policies that will guide our ongoing implementation of the Act. These policies will reflect the Office's experience to date, including the results of the file review process. They will provide structure and consistency to the operations, as well as clarity and transparency for our stakeholders, particularly those people who are considering making a disclosure or reprisal complaint.

The tabling of the first case of a wrongful act provided the Office with its initial experience of applying the relevant legislative requirements as specified in the Act. Similarly, the opportunity to learn was presented with the first filing of complaints of reprisal with the Tribunal which clarified the role of the Office in the process. In both instances, the Office put into motion untested internal practices, allowing for an evaluation of the resource requirements and identification of opportunities for improvement in the coming years.

The focus group study engaged a cross-section of our primary stakeholders, federal public servants, from across Canada. The results of this outreach provided the Office with valuable insight on perceptions and concerns with filing a disclosure of wrongdoing or a complaint of reprisal. This feedback was and will continue to be used to evaluate the effectiveness of our communication messages and tools, which are applied to our ongoing outreach activities.

Program Activity 2: Internal Services

Program Activity Descriptions

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization.

These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2011-12 Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Planned SpendingTotal AuthoritiesActual Spending
2,236 2,636 2,167


PSIC's actual spending in 2011-2012 towards its Internal Services was $2.2M, which is $0.1M (3%) lower than planned spending and $0.5M (18%) lower than total authorities. The reduced level of spending in comparison to the total authorities is a result of the unused operating budget carry forward. The reduced level of spending in comparison to the planned spending is a result of the vacant positions in 2011-12.

2011-12 Human Resources (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
PlannedActualDifference
10 9 1

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

In 2011-12 focus was on supporting recruiting efforts to ensure the right people to fulfill the organization's mandate were in place and supported. Internal communications were heightened with the number of new hires, including all staff meetings and encouraging participation in the strategic planning process.

Communications updated the catchphrase, "Tell us. You are protected.", to let people know our Office is safe and trusted and to convey an understanding that the decision to disclose a wrongdoing is not made lightly. This catchphrase was incorporated in the awareness tools used to facilitate outreach activities.

PSIC enhanced its internal monthly financial resource reporting to management to allow for opportunities and priorities to be evaluated on a timely basis. These modifications included implementation of internal control improvements recommended following an external review of business processes.

The information management strategy continues to evolve and the business requirements were defined in 2011-12. It is still anticipated this project will be completed in 2012-13.


Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of the Office's financial position and operations. PSIC has received unqualified audit opinions of its Financial Statements from the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, who has been PSIC's auditors since 2008. Comparative figures have been restated to conform to the current year's presentation of the revised Treasury Board Accounting Standard (TBAS) 1.2: Departmental and Agency Financial Statements.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position
As at March 31, 2012
($ thousands)
  Change
 %
2011–122010–11
Total net liabilities 1% 1,107 1,095
Total net financial assets 29% 600 464
Departmental Net debt -20% 507 631
Total non-financial assets 186% 306 107
Departmental Net financial position -62% (201) (524)

The 29% increase in PSIC's total net financial assets is predominately related to an increase in the Employee Benefit Plan year end adjustment and an increase in the Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund account. The total non-financial assets increase reflects the investment in leasehold improvements for increased accommodations for added staff and acquisition of secure remote access tools for staff.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position
For the Year Ended March 31, 2012
($ thousands)
  Change
 %
2011–122010–11
Total expenses -1% 5,931 5,982
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers -1% 5,931 5,982
Departmental Net financial position -62% (201) (524)

The 1% decrease in expenses is largely related to the non-recurring costs incurred in 2010-11 paid to the former commissioner and for the third party review of closed files, the decrease in severance expense as certain employee groups ceased to accumulate severance, offset by the increased expenses related to the growth in FTEs.

Financial Statements

The audited Financial Statements for the Office can be found on PSIC's Web site [v].

List of Supplementary Information Tables

Electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2011—12 Departmental Performance Report can be found on PSIC's website [vi]


Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

General Enquiries

If you have a comment or a question for PSIC, you can contact us by telephone or fax, by mail, or by e-mail.

Telephone: 613-941-6400
Toll Free: 1-866-941-6400
Fascimile: 613-941-6535 (general inquiries) or 613-946-2151 (secure transmission)

Mailing Address:
60 Queen Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa ON K1P 5Y7

Disclosures of Wrongdoing or Complaints of Reprisal

If you are thinking about disclosing wrongdoing or making a complaint of reprisal, we can provide you with more information about the process in complete confidentiality.

Please note: The Office does not accept formal disclosures of wrongdoing or complaints of reprisal via e-mail or this website because they cannot provide secure electronic transmission of personal or confidential information.

To submit a disclosure of wrongdoing or complaint of reprisal, fill out the appropriate form [vii] and mail, fax (secure transmission) or bring it to the Office in person.

Endnotes

i. Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada,
/menu-eng.aspx

ii. Library and Archives,
http://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/200/301/pwgsc-tpsgc/por-ef/office_public_sector_integrity_commissioner/2012/dec-11-e/report.pdf

iii. Government of Canada Outcome,
http://publiservice.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/descript-eng.aspx#bm04

iv. Public Accounts of Canada 2012,
http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/recgen/txt/72-eng.html

v. Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada, Financial Statements,
/quicklinks_liensrapides/11_12_finstats_etatsfin-eng.aspx

vi. Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada, List of Supplementary Information Tables,
content/2011-2012-departmental-performance-report-0

vii. Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada, Forms,
resources/forms

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